January’s Theme is Roots. A tree is made up of not only its colorful leaves, but also its bark, branches, and most of all — its roots. The roots exist to provide sustenance and a strong foundation for the rest of its body. Examine your own ‘roots.’ When you retrace them, what do you find? In his CreativeMornings talk, James Victore shares, ‘The things that made you weird as a kid make you great today. But only if you put it in your work.’ Identify the things that ground you and what you’ve carried with you over time. How have your roots shaped who you are today? The start of a brand-new decade gives you the perfect excuse to dig up the old and to nourish the elements that sustain you. Courageous, creative work begins below the ground. Our Québec chapter chose this month’s exploration of Roots and Félix Girardillustrated the theme. 

Lisa Hurst spoke on December’s theme SILENCE.

Hosted at Artpace on Friday, 12/13.

Cheers to our coffee partner Estate Coffee Company!

And high-five to TEKsystem for the breakfast tacos!

December’s Theme is Silence. As the end of the year draws near, life can get humorously hectic. We rush to finish up projects, try to squeeze in appointments with loved ones, and can easily lose track of ourselves in the process. Is this inevitable? Or can we find ways to ground ourselves amid all the chaos? In this busy season, create moments of stillness where you can. When silence is intentional, it is valuable and restorative. It brings us back to our senses and is essential to our holistic well-being. Acoustic ecologist Gordon Hemptondefines quiet as a ‘presence’ and ‘think tank of the soul.’ Silence is a powerful tool that allows us to take a step back from the atmosphere around us and realign with our intentions, our hopes, and ourselves. This December, set aside time to tune out the noise. You can go for a walk outdoors, find a cozy corner, or simply close your eyes. The magic of silence is that we can access it wherever we are.
Your beacon is the light that blazes within you, a signal made up of your values, dreams, and priorities. The essayist Anaïs Nin put it best when she wrote: “The unknown was my compass. The unknown was my encyclopedia. The unnamed was my science and progress.” Shine your light. Ask for help and let go of the idea that you have to make a perfect choice. You may feel lost, but you are not alone. Our Montevideo chapter chose this month’s exploration of Silence and Dani Scharfillustrated the theme.

John Gutzler spoke on November’s theme LOST.

Hosted at Launch SA on Friday, 11/15.

Cheers to our coffee partner Estate Coffee Company!

And high-five to TEKsystem for the breakfast tacos!

November’s Theme is Lost. When you’re wading through the unknown, it can feel scary and risky. You float around wondering if you’re going in the right direction and want to know what’s next. Being lost is a collaboration between possibility and uncertainty. It’s an excuse to get one step closer to a more fulfilling life.
What you were comfortable with may not be there anymore, but you will have the remarkable opportunity to reconnect with yourself and embrace discovery. In these “in-between” moments, turn to your inner beacon and pay close attention to where it’s guiding you.
Your beacon is the light that blazes within you, a signal made up of your values, dreams, and priorities. The essayist Anaïs Nin put it best when she wrote: “The unknown was my compass. The unknown was my encyclopedia. The unnamed was my science and progress.” Shine your light. Ask for help and let go of the idea that you have to make a perfect choice. You may feel lost, but you are not alone. Our Milwaukee chapter chose this month’s exploration of Lost and Melissa Lee Johnson illustrated the theme. 

Mary Heathcott spoke to October’s theme FLOW.

Hosted at The Bread Box in The Alley off Bitters on Friday, 10/18.

Cheers to our coffee partner Estate Coffee Company!

And smiles to TEKsystem and The Bread Box for the sweet treats!

October’s theme is Flow. It’s no secret that our modern-day world is full of distractions: Glowing screens. Notifications. 24-hour news cycles. At times, it can feel exhausting to try and get things done with all the bells and whistles competing for your attention. In his book, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, psychologist and researcher Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi theorizes that people are happiest when they are in a state of flow. Flow is the experience of completely immersing yourself in a singular pursuit and effectively applying your skills to it. When you’re in flow, your awareness of time momentarily dissolves. You’re in a temporary, but energizing state that helps you make progress with the task in front of you. So, how can you rise above the noise and get into flow? First, quiet your mind and take a deep breath. Then, pick one task (yes, just one) and set clear goals for it. Move or put away any distractions around you. Lastly, take your first action. Whether it’s writing your first sentence, drawing your first stroke, or playing your first note — dive in. Activate your flow and let it carry you where you need to go. Our Mexico City chapter chose this month’s exploration of and David Espinosaillustrated the theme. 

The DoSeum Education Team: Richard Kissel, Sheena Solitaire & Chris Navarro, spoke to September’s theme MUSE.

Hosted at The DoSeum on Friday, 9/27.

Cheers to our coffee partner Estate Coffee Company!

And thanks to TEKsystems & the Art of Donut for donuts!

September’s theme is Muse Whether you’re a mathematician tinkering with complex equations or a musician pairing discordant notes together, searching for inspiration can often send you in circles. The longer you sit and wait for an epiphany to strike, the harder it gets to make progress. What if you could get unstuck by turning to your muse? Your muse comes from the deepest parts of your imagination and guides you to new ideas. It invites you to bring your dreams to life using the raw materials found in your daily life. Artist and director Oroma Elewa once said, “I am my own muse. I am the subject I know best. The subject I want to know better.” * The next time you want to draw out your muse, stimulate your imagination in a different context. Leave your desk, take a walk outside, read something different, observe the ordinary, or try your hand at a new recipe. Chances are your muse will come out to play. Our Dubai chapter chose this month’s exploration of and Shahul Hameed illustrated the theme. Presented around the world by our Global Partner, Mailchimp. * Correction: We originally misattributed this quote to Frida Kahlo. Our community has since brought to our attention that these words belong to the artist Oroma Elewa. The quote has been widely misattributed as Frida’s and we want to do our part to correct the narrative and redistribute their accreditation to Oroma.

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