Bill Fordy discusses transparency when it comes to policing, the law, and the community.

Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police on April 10, 1989 where he was first posted to the Surrey Detachment. Somewhat uniquely, all of his service has been in the Lower Mainland, British Columbia.

He’s held a variety of positions within both police detachments and specialized units including the Serious Crime Section, Vancouver Polygraph Section, Special Projects Unit and Interview Team as well as the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team to name a few. His duties have given him an opportunity to travel and lecture in Canada and the United States on many topics. In 2014, he was appointed to the Order of Merit of the Police Forces by the Governor General of Canada.

Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy has been at the centre of a number of high-profile investigations during his career and he is a proud and committed member of the RCMP. He now oversees the Lower Mainland District which serves 1.8 million people and has in excess of 3,200 employees.

About the speaker

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Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police on April 10, 1989 where he was first posted to the Surrey Detachment. Somewhat uniquely, all of his service has been in the Lower Mainland, British Columbia.

He’s held a variety of positions within both police detachments and specialized units including the Serious Crime Section, Vancouver Polygraph Section, Special Projects Unit and Interview Team as well as the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team to name a few. His duties have given him an opportunity to travel and lecture in Canada and the United States on many topics. In 2014, he was appointed to the Order of Merit of the Police Forces by the Governor General of Canada.

Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy has been at the centre of a number of high-profile investigations during his career and he is a proud and committed member of the RCMP. He now oversees the Lower Mainland District which serves 1.8 million people and has in excess of 3,200 employees.

How do you define creativity and apply it in your career? I don’t believe in the status quo, or accept that failure is failure, so finding a path to success often involves breaking the ceiling of status quo. That often requires that you not allow yourself to be defined by what you are currently doing, or by the way others wish to define you. To me, being creative means not being afraid to take a chance, to embrace failure as success and to redefine the existing state of affairs.

Where do you find your best creative inspiration? By listening and trusting others.

What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person? You are going to make mistakes and not succeed many times throughout your life…and that’s a good thing.

Who would you like to hear speak at Creative Mornings? Bono, lead singer of U2

How does your life and career compare to what you envisioned for your future when you were a sixth grader? I didn’t grow up wanting to be a police officer. As a child, I thought I would be a professional hockey player. After I discontinued playing and had gone back to school, I was encouraged to join the RCMP. I did and was thinking that I would give it a year, or so to see how I liked it. I see clearly now that I was meant to serve others and my career has provided me that opportunity.

What are you proudest of in your life? I have two awesome kids. I am proud that they are both kind-hearted and gentle. I know they will make the world a better place. I’m also proud that I have continued to serve others through challenging times, and not pursued other opportunities that would have paid more money.

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