New Host Wanted

It’s been almost four years of CreativeMornings Rotterdam and we’re happy with our cozy monthly gatherings and the community that grew around these events! But they can’t continue without time and dedication. As the year ends, our host Diantha is ending her time with CreativeMornings, which means at the moment we are looking for a new host.

What are we looking for?

We are looking for a very competent, very reliable and trustworthy person, who believes in the power and potential of the creative community in Rotterdam and is willing to dedicate their time and effort to keep growing it.  The term is minimum one year, in Rotterdam, so please keep that in mind when applying.

You need to have experience leading a team and to be very organised. You have to be comfortable with a rather high level of responsibility and to make sure the events happen every month. You should also feel comfortable approaching potential partners and sponsors.

This is all done voluntarily, by the team and by speakers, locations and other stakeholders. It is, therefore, not a paid job.

How to apply?

If you are interested in being the host, please email us at rotterdam@creativemornings.com until the 14th of December and tell us:

-a bit about yourself (your name, your phone number, where you come from, what your background is, what you’re passionate about)

- whether you ever attended CreativeMornings events

- your motivation for the position: why do you want to be a host?

What was the decisive moment when you made up your mind to switch from corporate to digital nomad?
I was in Oahu, Hawaii, at an amazing yoga festival called Wanderlust. During a meditation session from David Ji about finding purpose, I felt deep inside I wasn’t on the right path. After that session I shared with my friends that I would leave my company and move to Bali (and so I did) to find my purpose. Being a nomad, you have to start over socially in every place you’ve been. What have you learned about the importance of creating a community wherever you go?
Without a community, I don’t feel at home in a different country. Living and working abroad means that you don’t have your support group from home (family and friends) and I really need friends + a support group to feel at home and thrive. I’ve lived abroad in Singapore (1 year), Toronto (2 years) and Bali (1 year) and the most important thing for me to feel at home is friends and support groups! How does that reflect in your support groups “Mastermind Rotterdam” and “Feminist Club Toronto”?
Support groups are not only my Mastermind Rotterdam Group, but also the fellow entrepreneurs who work at the same co-workings places. I also receive amazing support from my coaches. I have a lot of coaches: zen coach, business coach, mindfulness coach and mentor. When I question if I’m on the right path, if I shouldn’t go back to a stable income and a job, I talk to my persons! These people are the ones who both cheer on me but also challenge my thinking in new ways! How has this lifestyle impacted your life?
This lifestyle changed my vision on the work life balance. I don’t believe in the 9-5 culture anymore. I believe that working should be about finding purpose and doing something that really makes your hart beat faster. If it’s possible, it shouldn’t matter where you work and during which hours, as long as you get the job done. I believe in adding value to the company and working with deliverables and not in making hours!

What advice would you give our Creative Mornings Rotterdam community about starting a nomad life?

If you aspire to live the free lifestyle, go for it. Check www.nomadlist.com to find a great place to work and try it it. What do you have to loose? Ask yourself “why” you really want this lifestyle and go find a job or create a company which is easy to combine with this nomadic lifestyle. Biggest advice: GO FOR IT (and start today).

A growing creative community

It’s been almost four years (next Spring) of CreativeMornings Rotterdam and we’re happy with our cozy monthly gatherings and the community that grew around these events! Our team went through various transformations along the way and it continues to do so. As the year ends, our team mates Lucas and Diantha are ending their terms, which means at the moment we are looking for a new host.

What are we looking for?

We are looking for a very competentvery reliable and trustworthy person, who believes in the power and potential of the creative community in Rotterdam and is willing to dedicate their time and effort to keep growing it.  The term is minimum one year, in Rotterdam, so please keep that in mind when applying.

You need to have experience leading a team, to be very organised and good at planning. You have to be comfortable with a rather high level of responsibility and to make sure the events happen every month and everyone is doing their own job as planned. You should be a great communicator and to feel comfortable approaching potential partners and sponsors. Needless to say, we are looking for a team player, who will complete our group and fit in nicely. Since we are all volunteers, it’s very important that we enjoy our time together working on this.

About CreativeMornings 

If you’re not entirely familiar with what CreativeMornings means, you should know this is a monthly breakfast lecture series, founded in 2008 by Tina Roth Eisenberg in New York, aiming to connect people from the local creative community. The CM’s talks are free of charge and always include coffee or tea and a small breakfast. They now happen all over the world in over 150 cities every last Friday of the month.

What more?

This is all done voluntarily, by the team and by speakers, locations and other stakeholders. It is, therefore, not a paid job. We all put in our skills and time because we truly believe in this concept and we want to create a moment every month for people to be inspired and better connected to each other.

How to apply?

If you are interested in being the host, please email us at rotterdam@creativemornings.com before the 1st of December and specify:

- your name, your phone number, your age

- whether you ever attended CreativeMornings events and which ones

- whether you speak Dutch and how well

- your professional background, what do you do now, what did you study etc.

- something about you as a person (e.g. likes, dislikes, values, what’s unique about you)

- your motivation for the position: why do you want to be a host?

- what is your time availability for this voluntary position?

- whether you have time to come for a personal talk between 3-10 December in case you are selected.

If you know someone who fits this description, we’d appreciate if you forwarded this to them :)

What was the decisive moment when you made up your mind to switch from corporate to digital nomad?
I was in Oahu, Hawaii, at an amazing yoga festival called Wanderlust. During a meditation session from David Ji about finding purpose, I felt deep inside I wasn’t on the right path. After that session I shared with my friends that I would leave my company and move to Bali (and so I did) to find my purpose.

Being a nomad, you have to start over socially in every place you’ve been. What have you learned about the importance of creating a community wherever you go?

Without a community, I don’t feel at home in a different country. Living and working abroad means that you don’t have your support group from home (family and friends) and I really need friends + a support group to feel at home and thrive. I’ve lived abroad in Singapore (1 year), Toronto (2 years) and Bali (1 year) and the most important thing for me to feel at home is friends and support groups!

How does that reflect in your support groups “Mastermind Rotterdam” and “Feminist Club Toronto”?
Support groups are not only my Mastermind Rotterdam Group, but also the fellow entrepreneurs who work at the same co-workings places. I also receive amazing support from my coaches. I have a lot of coaches: zen coach, business coach, mindfulness coach and mentor. When I question if I’m on the right path, if I shouldn’t go back to a stable income and a job, I talk to my persons! These people are the ones who both cheer on me but also challenge my thinking in new ways!

How has this lifestyle impacted your life?
This lifestyle changed my vision on the work life balance. I don’t believe in the 9-5 culture anymore. I believe that working should be about finding purpose and doing something that really makes your hart beat faster. If it’s possible, it shouldn’t matter where you work and during which hours, as long as you get the job done. I believe in adding value to the company and working with deliverables and not in making hours!

What advice would you give our Creative Mornings Rotterdam community about starting a nomad life?

If you aspire to live the free lifestyle, go for it. Check www.nomadlist.com to find a great place to work and try it it. What do you have to loose? Ask yourself “why” you really want this lifestyle and go find a job or create a company which is easy to combine with this nomadic lifestyle. Biggest advice: GO FOR IT (and start today).

The theme of this month’s event is Equality. What is your view on that? Would you say everyone is equal, or rather that no-one is?

Equality is an interesting term because it looks like it is objective, while it is, most of the time, subjective. Legally, until fairly recently, women were not equal to men. People of color experience the same in western society. Culturally, we say that in the Netherlands there is equality for everyone; however, when a man has many different sexual encounters in a short timespan, he is treated totally different then the woman who does the same. So, they act equally, but the social reception of their behaviour is extremely unequal. Looks like a paradox to me.

Some trans-people hope to blend in. You, on the other hand, chose to turn your own story into a mission to help and educate others. What made you follow this path?

Living in the Netherlands, I have the privilege to be open about my trans-identity without getting into serious trouble or danger. Worldwide, the amount of hate-crimes experienced by transgender people is enormous, and therefore it is understandable that people would like not to be recognised as transgender. But with that invisibility comes another problem; what about the stigma on transgender people? If transgender people are not the norm, they are VERY abnormal, or they are invisible, there is no progress to a different cultural approach of transgender people. And from there we took action, because the constraints around ‘male’, ‘female’, masculinity and femininity are not only oppressing transgender people, but they keep everyone stuck in their own little labeled box.

You strive for openness about gender diversity. Are there any questions that still offend you or you really don’t want to hear (anymore)?

Yes, there definitely are. These are questions that focus merely on the physical part of being transgender. Questions you wouldn’t ask anyone else.

But because curiosity and open communication about gender diversity are a step in the right direction I made a project out of this; The Naked Truth - a video series where everyone can ask everything they always wanted to ask a transgender person, but didn’t dare to. We answer all questions, honestly and shirtless. After all, it’s the naked truth.

What is your ultimate dream for the future? What would you like to achieve?

I would like to achieve the understanding that everyone has their own perspective, their own background and their own way of understanding the world around them. This is different from person to person, and one is not more true than the other.

Identity is something you define yourself, and also on this matter, I would love to get rid of the sublime hierarchy that is now present. White able bodied, straight, masculine men, are the winners of the cultural identity game. Femininity is a flaw, a downgrade. It shouldn’t be, and none of the variations of human beings should be treated differently.

Some people say that “a picture is worth a thousand words”. That must be depressing for anyone earning a living from writing. For Tim de Gier these words are nothing but an encouragement. Tim has a talent for writing incredibly fast, yet sticking to the point. Last year Tim was in the US as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Now that we’ve got him back, we’re looking forward to hearing his thoughts on journalism, politics, and TRANSPARENCY.  But first we asked him some questions:

What do you want the future of journalism to be like?

For me personally I hope that my country finally gets some decent online publications. We’re years behind. I always feel I have to create my own circumstances. If someone could start a good newssite or online magazine, I’d be very happy. I don’t want to be a writer that only works from paper. I want to be an online writer. But a serious one. Our online publications are still mainly people that got fired from the legacy media.

What will the future of journalism be like?

In the next five months, up to the (Dutch) elections, it will be a battleground between ways of living: between the frontrow in the big cities and the backrow outside it. They have completely different value systems. There will be anger, there will be lies, there will be racism and hard critique. But it’s a confrontation we have to make. Journalism can’t be just for the happy few.

What’s the one topic you would like to know everything about?

The future of Europe. For the first time in years it’s very interesting. And surely, if we don’t do anything, the days of the EU are counted. I hope it’ll be alright. Coverage of European issues is quite mediocre. I want more. Now I have to read the Guardian and their country just left the union, damn it.

What can artists and designers learn from journalists?

I always taken journalism as a bridge between a very complicated pile of information and the audience. Artists and designers build the same bridges, using a different medium. Journalists however, are focused on the news and therefor in a world that changes super fast. It’s amazing how fast their (our) world changed in the last fifteen years. Journalists are always looking for ways to make information more accessible. Their ways of (self)promotion and the eternal struggle to make information relevant could be very inspiring. In your own way though. Please designers and artists, don’t become journalists. But learn from them, sure.

What’s the one topic you would like to know everything about?

Joost Prins: I would like to know everything about Rotterdam Zuid. My whole life I’ve lived on the North side of the river. Of course I’ve visited Zuid a lot, but only occasionally. I never got to know what Rotterdam Zuid is about. That’s strange because almost half of the population of Rotterdam lives there! So the last couple of months I started to explore Zuid by going there on my bike and wandering around some of the beautiful neighborhoods and cultures Zuid has to offer. It almost felt as if I was in an unknown city, instead of the city I was born and raised in. I was a bit ashamed that I felt like a tourist in my own city. If you think about it, I’m not the only Rotterdammer that knows so little about it. Many people who live in Rotterdam don’t know more about Zuid then the Kop van Zuid or De Kuip.

This is strange because it has a lot of rich cultures and nice and peaceful areas. Little streets and vibrant markets with vegetables you’ve never eaten before. You have areas where you see the old harbors of the city, where new developments are taking place and where you see the old Rotterdam and feel the new. I think it should be mandatory to know more about Zuid, to get to know it better, instead of talking about it. And like my grandpa always taught me “you’re never too old to learn something new”. So South, I want to tell you this: “I’m truly sorry I didn’t see you standing there for all those years. You are beautiful. I want to know everything about you. I hope you feel the same way. Let’s be friends.”

**

This mini-interview is part of a series on our community. On Friday, November 4 you’re invited to join us as we’ll talk about TRANSPARENCY, in Het Industriegebouw. Signup for our newsletter, and reserve your (free) ticket! 

Photo by Gaby Jongenelen fotografie

Martin van der Molen and Silas Nout are the skilled magicians behind Studio Mals, a Rotterdam based creative studio that produces eye catching images and film and beautifully crafted visual campaigns. We took the opportunity to ask Silas and Martin some questions on their work and this month’s topic MAGIC:

What’s Rotterdam’s most Magic place?

Our studio used to be located in Katendrecht. Although we moved out, we’re still in love with that place! The Deliplein always is nice place to enjoy food and drinks!

Who do you consider the Magician of all Magicians?

There are all kinds of magic designers who really inspire us. From graphic designers like Stefan Sagmeister to filmmakers like Aardman. It’s all over the place really. Whats most inspiring to us are people that go for it all the way. That unlimited energy to create something incredible is really inspiring!

Can you tell us about a trick that failed?

We fail all the time! When making the stuff we do by hand, a lot goes wrong. We have to improvise to make it work. For Lipton we shot commercials and that didn’t always go smooth! You can watch some behind the scenes and see things don’t always go right the first time!

Joren Joshua is a Rotterdam-based illustrator. You might recognize his work or maybe you just thought you did, and mistook his girlfriend’s (Ilse Weisfelt) mural for Joren’s. Its not only their styles that blend in every so often. That’s why Joren will be speaking on this month’s global theme: LOVE.

What is it like to collaborate with your girlfriend on projects?

Some days it’s the best thing in the world, other moments it’s just all feels like a really bad idea. It’s actually very cool to share the same interests and love for a certain subject. Due to that we can put a great deal of time into it. We experience lots of things together because of our work and we help each other out and strengthen our skills. It relaxing when you have extra time to spend with each other. Not everyone can take his colleague back home at the end of the day! But projects can also involve complex issues or setbacks and, of course, compromises. We both have a strong will, so that can cause clashes. Sometimes that happens during our design stage. Then we like each other just a little bit less. In the end of the day, it’s always easier to work together than to cook together!

What do you like best in working with Ilse?

Being a professional illustrator can be lonely, without peers. You’ll often be working at your desk or kitchen table. Your work or style is often quite personal, so all in all you’re spending a lot of time by yourself. Regarding that I totally don’t fit into this profession. I really like to be in a social environment, so I can interact. Collaborating on larger projects, like walls, with Ilse is like getting into an adventure. You share all the experiences during the process, the problems that you encounter and the things you come up with. You can then look back at these memories and results together. A bit similar to a vacation.

If you could choose anyone to professionally cheat with, who would it be?

Haha, I think this kind of cheating is still tolerated in our relationship. But let me check, just to be sure…! I don’t really have a role model. Most of my friends work within the creative sector, and I would always like to enter into a partnership with them. I believe that that chemistry can work well. It would always be an adventure!

What place in Rotterdam do you love the most and why?

I always try to go to new places. Rotterdam’s diversity made me want to move over here - the combination of old and new, chic and industrial and many nationalities. These are things that really excite me! I often feel like I’m in a foreign city. It’s like I’m travelling. And it’s a very relaxing feeling to then travel to your studio on a Monday morning.

To recall a specific spot, we live close to the ‘Dakpark’ in West. That’s a very well managed park, a bit futuristic, very open with a view of the cranes of the port and super beautiful industrial buildings. Since we have no garden or balcony it’s a perfect base for sitting, thinking or drinking a beer.

Dig into the past of our speaker, Andrew Spitz, and you’ll be surprised how versatile a man can be. Andrew is a Jack of all trades, and also a master of one: running FROLIC studio! Together with his co-founder Ruben van Vleuten, he designs meaningful and innovative products. Andrew often takes his cue from small and big problems - things that are broken. This also happens to be the global theme of June: BROKEN. We took the opportunity to get to know Andrew a bit better in advance.

You were born in Monaco, then lived in Africa, Korea, Scotland, USA, Denmark and many other countries. What is it like to let go of everything you know so well?

Living in new places often meant I had to start over many things. After every new move I had to get used to a new culture and needed to find new friends. I think that those experiences help me today in designing. As a designer you’re always creating into a new context. Through these personal experiences I can now put myself much easier into other people’s shoes.

What one thing are you really proud to have fixed?

When I was young in France, I was failing school so badly. I wasn’t fitting within the system and at a certain point I even got expelled. Only in South Africa I managed to get back in. Got my grades up and finally managed to get my exams. I’m really glad I got everything sorted out then!

I noticed you were a very active skydiver. Did those experiences have any effect on your current work as a designer?

Yes! Well in a way: at a young age I was really into skydiving. I wanted to capture our flights and so I became a skydiving cameraman. I really got into the camera work, and I decided to study film. I went to film school thinking that I would be doing cinematography, but I’m colourblind and that turned out to be a bad match. Really getting into things that excite me is something I do up till today. At the time I wanted to know everything about the best canopy (parachute), right now in a similar fashion I totally get into certain technologies.

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