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Meet the Winners of the Wix and CreativeMornings Contest

In December 2016 with one of our global partners, Wix, we asked the community to submit their favorite piece of original artwork.

We received 7,000+ submissions from all over the world, getting a panoramic view of the talent that resounds everywhere.

The three winners are getting a stunning online store, complete with products featuring their art.

Here are the there winners of contest, plus a short interview on what inspired them and what they hope to accomplish.


Meet Emilia Kaitazoff

emilia
Emilia Kaitazoff is a Graphic Designer based in Montevideo, Uruguay. Since a little kid, she always loved to draw. She began to teach herself digital illustration, picturing everything that came into mind, from random life situations to animals and nature. Currently, she’s working as a freelance illustrator and keen to improve on the animation field.

dancer

Tell us about your submission. What was the inspiration behind this piece? What does it mean to you?

The main inspiration behind this illustration was “Danse Macabre” by the French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. Although at the outset I wasn’t aware of the meaning of the composition, while listening to it I could imagine a girl peacefully dancing to the rhythm of the music. As soon as I started a further research I found that the contrast between the main theme of the piece and the girl’s calmness was very interesting.

Most of the times I get inspired by music, I just love the way it makes you see things without actually seeing anything.

What do you hope to accomplish with your new store?

Through this store I hope I can show my work all over the world in a way I’ve never done before, either printed on mugs, cushions or any other object. However, going beyond digital and social media is what I’m most excited about and makes this a very exciting and unique opportunity.

Why do you think it’s so difficult to turn one’s art into a business? What advice would you give to other artists that are hesitant to share their talent with the world?

I think that the biggest challenge is to understand who your audience is; once you have an idea you can start to develop a style that fits you. Art is so subjective, there’s always going to be the ones who love your work and the ones who hate it.

My main advice is to dare to show your work through all the means that are available. The Internet is one of the most helpful tools of our time, we have to be aware of the new opportunities that keep coming.

Check out Emilia’s new store with her artwork featured on products.

Discover more of Emilia’s work on Facebook, Instagram, and Behance.


Meet Franck Pitoiset

franck
Born in Dijon, France in 1973, Franck studied engraving, graphic arts, performance, photography and video, experimental and background music in Dijon’s School of Arts. His work is a combination of family tradition: embroidery on household linen, fine fabrics, modernity, and computer-aided design.

pea

Tell us about your submission. What was the inspiration behind this piece? What does it mean to you?

For this creation, I was inspired by my childhood memories. I am a son of a farmer and in our farm we were surrounded with animals every day. We had among others a couple of peacocks. The male strutted about in the middle of the hens and the cocks. Very often, I admired this peacock spreading its magnificent tail of brilliant feathers to seduce all the feminine farmyard. Unfortunately, his female was devoured by a starving fox. The poor lover cried for several days and like Romeo, died from sorrow.

What do you hope to accomplish with your new store?

Thanks to this prize, I hope to sell by-products in several countries and have a massive distribution to be then able to make known my range of luxury wallpapers, which are for sale on my personal online shop.

Why do you think it’s so difficult to turn one’s art into a business? What advice would you give to other artists that are hesitant to share their talent with the world?

In my humble opinion, it is very difficult for an artist to transform art into by-products because even if things evolved since the 20s, art, design, fashion, crafts are still too elitist worlds where ego and narcissism are still too present, where universes remain compartmentalized.

Furthermore, when we are an artist, we do not necessarily know how to make and conceive one even objects; it is also often difficult to speak about one’s work which requires skills in communication and marketing, which we do not have.I have no advice to give because every artist has his or her own personality, his or her personal way to work and create.

However I think that it is important to trust one’s instincts and positive energy because they are real strengths to multiply initiatives and propose its artistic creations in various places and not inevitably art galleries.Anyway, an artist should never lose courage and one thing remains true: a refusal is never a failure but the great opportunity to believe in it even more, to progress, to continue to create and never stop.To finish, I believe that every artist should remain always humble with oneself and their personal work.

Check out Franck’s new store with his artwork featured on products.

Discover more of Franck’s work on Facebook, Google+, iShop, Instagram, and Pinterest.


Meet Marie-Pier Mercier

marie
Marie-Pier is a graphic designer and illustrator from Montreal, Canada. She’s passionate about her craft, so much that she spends about twenty-five hours a day drawing, thinking about drawing, or just getting lost in thoughts. Marie draws inspiration from nature and real life situations, but always with a touch of irony, humor, and sensitivity.

illus

Tell us about your submission. What was the inspiration behind this piece? What does it mean to you?

It’s actually part of a collection of illustrations I made. They’re inspired from a novel I love, called “Barbe-Bleue” (Bluebeard). It’s from a Belgian author I admire, Amelia Nothomb, and after reading, I felt a compelling need to draw the imagery it had invoked in my mind. The end result was a collection of silk-printed illustrations, and I entered my favorite in the contest. It was the one I had the most fun doing. It symbolizes the release of tension and letting go of falling in love. The euphoria of two people abandoning themselves to each other without restraint — I’m a romantic!

What do you hope to accomplish with your new store?

I hope I can “make it” in the illustrating world, get positive feedback and grow a customer base. I hope it can be a stepping-stone leading to a successful career as an illustrator.

Why do you think it’s so difficult to turn one’s art into a business? What advice would you give to other artists that are hesitant to share their talent with the world?

It can be challenging. I think it’s hard for an artist, an illustrator, to take his or her art, his or her take on the universe and sometimes his or her whole inner world and sell it. Marketing is both necessary to growing a successful business and immensely hard to bear for an artist.

When you’re starting out and doing everything by yourself, as most artists do, you have to treat your art as merchandise instead of as a part of you. That’s not easy, and it can put a strain on the creative process. But I think it can also be beneficial. You grow as an artist, and as a person; you get an outsider’s perspective. If you’re hesitant, you need to get involved with other people in your field who sell their art. It helps to better understand the industry and how you fit within it. Not only you’ll get to meet other like-minded people, but you’ll also get the support and help you’ll need to make it.

Don’t be scared! You have to make the jump. My mantra is: if you’re scared of something, it’s probably the way to go. If you don’t believe in yourself, no one will.

Check out Marie’s new store with her artwork featured on products.

Discover more of Marie’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

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