“The beauty in our world deserves to be cherished, sustained, and rediscovered. We share this life, and every day we have the opportunity to act as thoughtful participants in it.” May’s theme is #CMpreserve! It was chosen by CreativeMornings/Charleston and illustrated by Chris Nickels (chrisnickels.net). 

For those who are new or have recently updated their profiles we are sending you a highfive. #NationalHighFiveDay #keepitfresh

image

Q&A with April speakers—Sage Quiamno and Aparna Rae—who will be speaking on the topic INCLUSIVE.


Sage Quiamno, Co-Founder of Future for Us

1. How do you define creativity and apply it in your career?
Creativity means breaking boundaries, creating new rules and challenging the status quo. Creativity is adaptation.

2. Where do you find your best creative inspiration?
Art, music and culture. I lean on my ancestry and heritage to remind me of my values.

3. What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person?
Seek inspiration outside of your sphere.

4. Who would you like to hear speak at CreativeMornings?
Cristina Martinez, owner and artist of June and Mars

5. What fact about you would surprise people?
I’ve paddled with an outrigger canoe crew 36 miles from Newport beach to Catalina Island.

6. What music are you listening to these days?
Lauryn Hill MTV Unplugged performance album.

7. What was the best advice you were ever given?
The best advice I was given was to be your own best friend and give yourself grace.


Aparna Rae, Co-Founder of Future for Us

1. How do you define creativity and apply it in your career?
Creativity is drawing outside the lines, pushing edges, and getting uncomfortable.  

2. Where do you find your best creative inspiration?
Lately, in moments when I’m away from screens. In the mountains, on the water, while cooking. Most days, I’m inundated with information, and in moments when my mind takes a break from ‘work’, things click and I find creative inspiration.

3. What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person?
Build a routine and stay disciplined. It seems like the opposite of spontaneity, which we associate with creatives and creativity, but it’s a myth I’d like to set straight.

4. Who would you like to hear speak at CreativeMornings?
Michaela Ayers, Nourish

5. What fact about you would surprise people?
I’m an introvert!

6. How does your life and career compare to what you envisioned for your future when you were a sixth grader?
I wanted to be an archaeologist and an artist, living in the South of France. Never envisioned a life as an entrepreneur.

7. What music are you listening to these days?
Coke Studio Pakistan

8. What was the best advice you were ever given?
Do your best and focus on building mastery today, stop obsessing about the future.

CREATIVE WORKS COMES TO SEATTLE MAY 11th, 2019
101 S Jackson St, Pioneer Square 9 talks, 12 vendors…

One amazing day designed to connect, inspire and empower a united creative community. 

Get your ticket →

Creative Works is more than just a one-day event…We’re a diverse community of creatives that believe our work matters and change is possible.

Join us May 11 in Pioneer Square for Creative Works One-Day: Seattle. One-Day is designed to connect, inspire and empower a united creative community. Hear stories, shop and hang with renown creatives and makers from around the country all in one space…all in one day.

Speakers: Cameron Campbell of Amazon / Adam J. Kurtz / Ash Huang of Adobe / Dan Kuhlken and Nathan Goldman of DKNG Studios / Amy & Jennifer Hood of Hoodzpah Design Co. / Dan Janssen of Lincoln Design Co. / Mina Markham of Slack / Marisol Ortega / Jesse Bryan of Belief Agency

Market Vendors: Draplin Design Co. / Field Notes / Notes to Self / Odds and Sods / Lincoln Design Co. / Adam J. Kurtz / DKNG Studios / Keymaster Games / Workspace / Marisol Ortega / Pretty Useful / Victor Melendez

Find more info on the event website.

The Future of Work is here.

The Future for Us Assembly on April 27th is a day long conference full day of power-packed panels, fireside chats and workshops, for womxn of color with big dreams, and bold ideas that are ready to take flight. Leave the day with actionable skills that will equip you in your career to ascend to leadership, and a community to help you meet your goals. We know that across all sectors, 21st century workplace falls short in meeting the aspirations of womxn of color. Together we can to open more doors and make room at the table for womxn of color, and accelerate the evolution of workplaces where womxn thrive.
*Note: This conference specifically geared for womxn of color professionals. 

Sign-up for The Assembly!

Connect with leaders, create community and engage with incredible allies.

BUY TICKETS

About Future for Us

Future for Us is a platform dedicated to advancing womxn of color at work through community, culture and career development. We envision a future of work where womxn of color lead at the highest levels of corporate, government, and social sector organizations. We do this through a mix of monthly events, large-scale conferences for both womxn of color professionals and allies, and research.

Post talk notes from Melany Bell

Add organic Bone Broth and a variety of fermented foods to your diet daily.
Use the stool chart to monitor your digestive progress
Chris Kresser - chriskresser.com
Donna Gates - bodyecology.com
Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride - gapsdiet.com
Dr. Emoto’s “Messages From Water‘ 
‘Your Body’s Many Cries For Water’ by F. Batmanghelidj
Dr. Bruce Lipton’s "The Biology of Belief”
And YouTube anything by Tom Campbell or Dr. Thomas Warren CampbellHere is a creative introduction to the Physics of the Mind/Body. Please view “What the Bleep Do We Know” short form first :What the Bleep Do We Know - Short form
http://youtu.be/ioONhpIJ-NY

What the Bleep! Down the Rabbit Hole - Quantum Edition, part 1
http://youtu.be/rdulFAR0-Aw
What the Bleep! Down the Rabbit Hole - Quantum Edition, part 2 http://youtu.be/k7fJ80o288wJohn Hagelin PhD, Harvard:
Consciousness, a Quantum Physics Perspectivehttp://youtu.be/RJ4Uv-5_3VM

Our Q&A with March speaker, Melany Bell who will be talking on the topic of Water

CreativeMornings Seattle - How do you define creativity and apply it in your career?
Melany Bell - Creativity can be defined as a measurable amount of energy applied to mastering a concept; then applied and synthesised said concept into a new point of view or invention.  Flipping information. Taking new approaches that reduce entropy.

———-

(CMSEA) - Where do you find your best creative inspiration?
(MB) - My best source for inspiration is conceptualizing Infinite Intelligence. Attempts to understand the Infinite never get old. Physics and Human function have been a focal point. But I started as a performing Artist so Human behavior was always fascinating for me. In what ways are we eternal? How do I explain where a quark goes in my art? How can I get a bunch of people to think about the most important questions without pissing them off? How many people give themselves the time to think about Everything and share those ideas?

———-

(CMSEA) - What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person?
(MB) - Listen to the smartest people on the planet. From every culture, every religion, every race etc. Try to not get stuck with one Teacher or one idea of anything. Knowledge is an Infinite pool bumping into another pool of Itself all the time. Every person we meet has an eternity of experience to share with us.

———-

(CMSEA) - Who would you like to hear speak at CreativeMornings?
(MB) -  I would like to hear Thomas Warren Campbell. One of my favorite physicists.

———-

(CMSEA) - What myths about creativity would you like to set straight?
(MB) -  It comes naturally.

———-

(CMSEA) - What was the best surprise you’ve experienced so far in life?
(MB) - I have a habit of wanting to know everything I can about myself. I come clean about everything I can. Identity empowerment is a huge thing. My eldest Sister Dione, did some research on our Family that strongly reincarnated the right to be a writer in me. I wrote several plays and books in a year.  There is so much about where we come from and knowing your purpose that supersedes so many barriers. Finding your purpose is why I contemplate the Infinite. Purpose directs our behavior and choices in life. Know thy self.

Our Q&A with February speakers, Cali & Brian who will be talking on the topic of Symmetry and Structure in Storytelling

Brian McDonald, Chief Storyteller at Belief Agency

1. How do you define creativity and apply it in your career?

I think “creativity” was a word created by people who weren’t creative, because for creative people it is just the way they see the world. Most people have access to their own creativity. It’s those who are able to push-through their self-judgement who can exercise that creativity. When we say creative, we usually mean the arts—but there can be creative electricians and creative doctors.

2. Where do you find your best creative inspiration?

The world is full of inspiration. Drawing on it is really just a matter of being an antenna, open to what the world offers.

3. What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person?

The way that you think is good enough.

4. Who would you like to hear speak at CreativeMornings?

I would love to hear award-winning novelist and University of Washington English professor, Charles Johnson, speak at CreativeMornings. Johnson is an African-American scholar and the author of dozens of novels, short stories, screen-and-teleplays, and essays. He won the National Book Award in 1990 for his novel, Middle Passage .

5. What are you reading these days?

I’m currently reading Alex Haley’s Roots: Saga of an American Family. It’s one of the most important books of the 20th century, especially as a lens for racial and political history. I’m working on my memoir right now, and I want to write something just as enduring. I aim high. I always have a high-water mark when I’m writing or directing—it’s why I have a Schindler’s List poster on the wall in my office.

6. When you get stuck creatively, what is the first thing you do to get unstuck?

Being stuck is just being afraid, and fear is more often than not a liar. When it comes to being creatively stuck, it’s usually a fear that the reality of what you can do doesn’t match what you have in your imagination. You don’t actually overcome this fear, but in naming it you allow yourself to work through it. You just push through. It’s about endurance. Can you allow that fear to energize rather than block you?

Cali Pitchel Schmidt, Creative Director at Belief Agency

1. How do you define creativity and apply it in your career?

For a long time I idealized creativity—I thought it was something you either had or you didn’t. And I did not have it. I was in a field (academia) that did not fit my narrow definition of creativity, so I was unable to see myself as creative. Creativity, in my mind, was for the arts. If I couldn’t paint or draw or sing, I couldn’t possibly be creative. But over the course of my career I’ve come to learn that was patently false. I believe creativity is a democracy—it’s available for anyone who’s willing to look for it inside themselves. Anyone who is willing to widen their aperture. The hardest work is in creating the conditions for your creative expression to flow freely.

2. Where do you find your best creative inspiration?

I’ve always been a keen observer—I’m taking in all the data, all the time. At times all that sensory data can be overwhelming, but it also keeps me open to finding creative inspiration everywhere. That’s the key: be open. When you’re open, you can find inspiration in the unlikeliest of places.

3. What’s the one creative advice or tip you wish you’d known as a young person?

I wish I could have shed more of my self-consciousness when I was younger. Self-consciousness, for me, has always been the enemy to creativity. I still have to remind myself to be more interested in what I’m pursuing than in how others perceive that pursuit.

4. Who would you like to hear speak at CreativeMornings?

I’m so interested in the changing nature of the marketplace and how more and more consumers are expecting the brands they buy from to effect meaningful social change. I would love to hear from a behavioral economist or a cultural anthropologist on how this happened, and what we can expect to see as the way we market our goods and services evolves to meet these demands.

5. What are you reading these days?

I’ve been reading a lot lately. I usually go through seasons where I’m consuming different kinds of media, and right now it’s books. (Sometimes it’s all Netflix. Other times it’s all WikiArt.) I’m currently reading a book of essays by Camille Paglia titled, Provocations: Collected Essays . I’m also working my way through some Taoist texts—which makes me sounds far more actualized than I am. 90% of it doesn’t make sense to me, but then I’ll read something that will resonate so deeply it feels life-changing. I need all the remove from my ego I can get, and I find that the more I can respond rather than react, the better everything gets—especially my ideas.

6. How does your life and career compare to what you envisioned for your future when you were a sixth grader?

In elementary school I wanted to be the President—which should surprise no one who knows me. And although I’m not living the life I imagined at age 11, every stage of my life and career has surprised me in the most exceptional ways. What I’m doing today I couldn’t have envisioned this time last year. I love leaving room for possibility and being open to different paths and opportunities. I started my career in academia, and I had no idea I’d end up as a creative director and organizational consultant. The most valuable lesson is that every experience, however diverse, can move you toward that thing— what you’re best at.

January’s theme is SURREAL


When you look at the artwork of Frida Kahlo or Salvador Dalí, there’s an element of surprise. Why does it feel familiar yet also otherworldly? Surrealists sought to break free from the shackles of the rational mind and dive into the deep end of the unconscious. The canvas, then, became a mirror for what emerged out of that process. This movement was inspired by events in the 1920s on the heels of the first world war and continues to influence artists, writers, photographers, and filmmakers. This cultural and artistic movement ushered in new techniques that helped humans expand their minds. Today, we recognize a sense of the surreal in unexpected moments in daily life. Art exhibits like Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Room are becoming readily available, encouraging people to immerse themselves in experiences that break reality. A ballet performance or a silent meditation retreat can be a dreamlike experience. Whether we experience a surreal moment or dabble in processes like drawing without thinking or writing without self-editing, there’s something to be learned about ourselves and what lingers under the hood of our desires to keep life orderly and controlled. Happy New Year! Our Brussels chapter chose this month’s exploration of Surreal and Charlotte Dumortier illustrated the theme. SURREAL is presented globally this month by WordPress.com.
more