Next Cardiff speaker

Jessica Morgan – Death

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November 24, 8:30am • The Sustainable Studio • part of a series on Death

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Language

Language is about more than words. Language is the way we communicate with one another - that can be through speech, of course, but it can also include the unspoken ways in which we share meanings, feelings, thoughts, ideas, reactions and ourselves with other people.

Books, films and artwork all use language to tell their story; in the overt way, through words, but also through linguistic techniques - subverting our knowledge and expectations of language and its accepted conventions. The study of semiotics helps us to ‘decode’ the meanings of things that we can take from a scene or an image or a sentence, which is not explicitly stated. We are constantly absorbing things through language it its many guises.

There is a language of design too. Designers must often create a single visual that conveys a brand, an idea, an ethic and a distinctive style that can be absorbed in a single glance; recognised and remembered in the future by people who are constantly bombarded with images and ideas and messages.

Language isn’t just about speaking to each other; which language you use in the shop or shouting expletives at traffic: the very purpose of language is being able to reach each other and share things that often can’t be contained in words. It’s how we connect as communities, as artists as professionals and as people.

By Jenny Allan @SerenLasCopy

Work by Helen Di Duca

Like it or not, for most of us, our lives revolve around work (sigh). Many of us will think ‘Do I need to re-evaluate my life?’ or ‘God, I remember reading about people reaching this point in their life’, you know when we were young and didn’t need to work, but is it such a bad thing?

Let’s take a look at the bigger picture; the people we work with. Many of the meaningful relationships, for your everyday member of society, will have been formed in or around work. Bonds will have been built, ideas will have been shared and we will be a stronger, more productive individual than when we entered the role (hopefully). Arguably this is reflected by many when at the point of looking for a new challenge or opportunity. One of the main reasons we ‘stay put’ is because our “work family” are great. Let’s face it; we spend 2/3 of our lives with them, more time than with our friends and loved ones.

Looking at working relationships, Raymond Meredith BeIbin spent his career researching and developing management theory, looking at ways group dynamics can be used for optimum productivity. Belbin was able to categorise an employee and build teams so they could reach optimum operation. An interesting starting point if you’re looking at relationships and how to create a positive and productive organisational culture.

Combine this with what makes people tick and the skills they excel in and you’ll be on the winning team. The more we invest in the people we work with, the stronger the industry we work in becomes. For example, in the last 2 years the productivity of the arts and cultural sector has increased by 6%, generating £76.9bn across the UK creative economy, here in Wales that equates to 51,000 jobs.

Get to know those you work with, they may surprise you. Let’s make the creative community here at CreativeMornings and beyond, stronger, more passionate and productive than ever. That way we can make more of an impact on the creative economy and make changes across other sectors raising the value of core thing we do, be creative.

Shock

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Shock, like sex, sells. In a world where clickbait headings and tabloid extremism are used to peddle beauty products, lifestyles and dubious political affiliations it is becoming harder and harder to shock people. We’re now wary of articles telling us we’ll ‘never believe what happened next’, or lists that assure us that number six will astonish us. We grow desensitised, apathetic, mistrustful.

In art shock is used to the opposite effect; to jolt us out of our comfort zones and make us consider our own situations from another perspective, or to demonstrate the full impact of someone else’s story. Shocking an audience captures their attention and focuses it on what you want to say, which is why it’s employed by advertisers and tabloid journalists as a cheap sales tool. For the artist there is no commercial gain, and this is the difference between shock and the crudity of sensationalism.

Shocks to the system can do us good; they shake up our thoughts, they breed creativity and open new perspectives and they challenge us so that we don’t just accept and submit and trudge along day after day. Sensationalism keeps us wrapped in our comfort blanket of procured idealism and distances us from a reality we don’t want to engage with, and therefore cannot change.

Through art we are able to visualise and actually experience a reality other than our own. Art that can shock is a powerful and emotive tool – used well it can change the world; used cheaply and it may or may not sell a new line of diet pills.

It’s tough to see where we go next. What will shock the next generation? What will be ‘too much’? What will make us stop?

Post by Jenny Allan @serenlascopy

Revolution

Society seems to centre on revolution in some way or another; as if it is a pivotal concept that mediates a wildly diverse society being ruled by a few individuals working within a highly specific set of beliefs. A way of restoring balance.

It is impossible to please a group of millions at once. The varying needs, attitudes, politics, beliefs, religion, class etc. within a society cannot be governed in such an idealistic and simplistic way. It is possible to argue that democracy provides relief in the form of regular referenda, but in a society that grows ever more politically apathetic the representation of the needs of the masses begins to wane and people search for more radical ways in which to bring about the changes they need.

Historically revolutions have been bloody, righteous uprisings against tyranny and oppression and we make retrospective heroes of the prominent figures; Owain Glyndwr, Che Guevara, Robespierre. We love a figure who stands up for what they believe in – as long as we are not the ones who have to do the standing up. We are willing for them to carry out the often-necessary atrocities in the name of freedom. But one person’s freedom will always be another’s oppression.

Creative revolutions are generally less bloody, but are always as poignant. If art is a tangible representation of the world as the artist sees it (as Eisenstein suggests with the notion of the Kino eye) then without cultural, artistic, linguistic change there can be no societal development.

Art opens people’s eyes, because it allows us to see the world from somebody else’s perspective.

Politics, like art, is about relationships and how we see and do things. But art has the scope for inclusivity, participation, tolerance and opinion.

Art and culture and creativity revolutionise by allowing people to see from a multitude of perspectives at once and learning to accept them all, even as we dislike or disagree with many.

Post by Jenny Allan @SerenLasCopy

Ink by Gareth Strange

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Invitation to speak at Creative Mornings

Two weeks before the Creative Mornings Ink event, I was really looking forward to it. I was wondering who the speaker might be, what he or she would have to say and what I would learn. As a designer and illustrator I work with ink every day, so this event definitely appealed to me. Then, one afternoon, Sarah, the organiser of Creative Mornings Cardiff asked me if I would fancy speaking at the event. I pondered the invitation for a night or two whilst I pieced together a talk in my head, then accepted with excitement.

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My presentation

Over the next week or so, I worked on my talk figuring out what approach and direction it would take. I decided to talk a little bit about the challenges of coming up with new illustration or visual styles for different brands or clients – taking a closer look at my process and experience. I selected projects I thought the audience would enjoy hearing about, such as Hokkei where I created an entire typeface which became central to the brand’s visual communications.

As a designer, I feel my presentation slides have got to look good - it’s nice to give the audience something interesting to look at too. As the topic was Ink, I decided not to use any system fonts at all. Instead, I hand rendered the typography using a calligraphy pen and ink –  more time consuming but definitely worth it. Especially as we had a last minute slight technical glitch which would have defaulted all my fonts to Arial. Phew!

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Self portraits

I didn’t want this to become a ‘show and tell’ kind of talk, I wanted the audience to participate as Ink is such a universal topic. Everyone has picked up a pen and drawn something at some point in their life, and everyone has a unique style. Far too often we hear people say “ I can’t draw” or “I wish I could draw”, so I decided to challenge every member of the audience to draw a self portrait as they entered the Abacus. The results were amazing – it was clear no two drawings had the same style when I looked at them all displayed in the reception area.

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The story of James Thurber

The idea of everyone having their own style of drawing linked to a story that I told during my talk, the story of James Thurber. Thurber was an American humorist in the 1930s who wrote incredibly witty stories – however, he felt illustrations were needed to support his words. Being young and having just moved to New York he didn’t have a great amount of money to spend on professional illustrators, so he decided to have a go himself. Untrained and inexperienced as an illustrator, this must have been an intimidating challenge – but his drawings - made up of simple lines, had a real charm about them and helped to bring his stories to life. James Thurber went on to become a cartoonist for the New Yorker magazine for many years and his works went on to inspire the likes of John Lennon. Now, if you look James Thurber up on Wikipedia it says he was an American cartoonist, author, journalist and playwright who celebrated wit. A cartoonist first.

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Work on show

For me Creative Mornings Cardiff is more than just a monthly talk. It’s about the city’s creative community getting together and meeting new people. Myself and the Creative Mornings team invited some of our favourite local illustrators and artists to display their work at the event. We had beautiful inky based prints on show from the talented Belinda Love Lee, Dale Johnson, James Reid and myself. It was great to see such a wide range of work on display and was a real celebration of the talent and diversity Cardiff has to offer.

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A print to mark the event

I always have several personal projects on the go – and one that I was working on the week Sarah invited me to speak was inspired by a five year old named Isaac. Isaac is my friend’s son who made me a ‘thank you’ card for lending him a Playstation controller so he could have a mate around to play games. On the card, he drew the controller in such a naive way, a way an adult would have real difficulty replicating. I decided to try and impersonate this style by drawing celebrities with my left hand – before I knew it, I had around fifty portraits.

This gave me the idea of creating a print to mark the event. I decided to ask the audience to take a selfie and tweet it using the hashtag #CreativeMorningsSelfie and I would then draw everyone in the audience, with my left hand. I was a little nervous people wouldn’t be up for this, but so many people got involved (even Goldie!) leaving me with my work cut out. I had around 40 portraits to do .

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A success!

For me, the event was a huge success – I enjoyed every minute of the morning, I met lots of lovely people and the feedback was really positive. I would like to thank Sarah and the Creative Mornings team for the invitation and support  throughout. I’m also thankful to everyone who came along to the event and I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. If you couldn't come along and you'd like to watch the talk just check out the video.

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Ink

Ink has a permanence about it. Indelibly imposing our art onto a surface has a specific appeal – whether it is tattoo art, calligraphy, drawing, writing…you can’t rub ink out. It is not like paint or pencil. There is not soft indistinctness or suggestive impressions; ink art is definite, brash and certain.

Art in ink is a statement. It is confidence. It is a way of expressing a boldness and assertiveness by making a mark that, once made, cannot be changed. It is a mark of skill and an expression of self-possession. With ink there is nowhere to hide, but for those willing to use it as a medium, the brightness, the versatility and the aesthetic of ink is its own reward.

Post by Jenny Allan @SerenLasCopy

Art & Climate

If art is our creative response to stimuli it is inevitable that art must reflect the climate in which we live; we are enveloped by it, it is the politics we believe, the society we perpetuate and the environment we cultivate.

In considering this we can consider ourselves and our own responses to the climate we each find ourselves in – because it is different for each of us and our perceptions are regulated by the very specific and individual way we perceive our surroundings.

We can look at art as a selective filter. A piece of art can be taken as an individual’s perspective on a particular element of their climate – a realisation of a reaction provoked by an external source. Perhaps, in turn, that art can affect the climate from which it has sprung.

Climate influences our thoughts and perceptions and therefore our art. If it is true that it is art not reason which causes passion and revolutionary action then is it fair to argue that art can change the world and, more importantly, the way we see it?

Post by Jenny Allan @SerenLasCopy

A Question of Beauty by Jenny Allan.

How do we decide what is beautiful? Is beauty truly skin deep or is it context which allows us to see past the aesthetics of something and be touched by it?

Some people would argue that we can’t decide what is beautiful; that it’s an emotional reaction we have no control over. We can be moved at the sight of a ragged old comfort blanket from childhood and left cold by an acclaimed artwork.

So if our personal contexts inform our ideas of beauty, are we touched by a quality in something that resonates with something inside ourselves? Could it be that art is a way of discovering what that something is, and, by doing so, finding people who are moved by this same quality as we are?

Could it also be true of the things we find ugly? Perhaps the bad things that happen in our lives, the shameful, the distressing (as well as the happy, bright and good things) subconsciously change us and influence us and the way we think. And the way we see things.

Art and beauty. Art and ugliness. The purpose of art is to provoke an emotional reaction; to find that deeply personal quality within ourselves and within each other and to create something from that which will change the way we feel or think. It’s not something that can be quantified, or often even put into words; our idea of beauty is in our pasts, our stories, our associations and it is that which informs our eyes and finds the qualities in something that, sometimes, no-one else can see.

We'd love to hear from you about beauty and ugliness; why not send us some hideously beautiful designs, poetry, prose, photographs or art of any kind - we’ll be happy to share them on our social media and at Creative Mornings Cardiff on January the 30th.

Nadolig llawen a blwydden newydd dda! 

The CM Cardiff team are second only to St Nick himself on the frantically busy Christmas front. We’ve been busily creating loads of exciting stuff for you lucky people for 2015; you can come say hello to us on Facebook now https://www.facebook.com/pages/CreativeMornings-Cardiff/1559057737646044 and don’t forget to join in our exciting Christmas Love on Twitter @CM_Cardiff. If you share your Christmas celebrations (digital, photographic, poetic - anything!) with us we’ll RT and pop our favourites on our new Facebook page!

We’re also exploring some new venues for Creative Mornings 2015 so we can shake things up a bit and help you all get to know the different and beautiful places in Cardiff - stay tuned for more about that soon.

We are currently making plans for January and will be sure to let everyone know when everything is confirmed. We have some great themes and speakers lined up for next year and we’d love to hear about your Christmases and your creative ideas for the future, so make sure you get in touch!

Post by Jenny Allan @SerenLasCopy

 

Alex Jenkins on Cardiff & Chance

We caught up with Alex following his brilliant talk in November on Chance to hear his take on Creative Mornings and Creativity in Cardiff. 

What makes Cardiff special to you? (Creatively or personally)

Cardiff now has world class architecture, a very vibrant creative community, great bars, music venues and great places to eat. I think we could still do better though. I think Cardiff could be rebranded in a very dynamic, vibrant way, placing Cardiff firmly at the forefront of creative thinking on a global scale (see Antwerp).

Rebranding Cardiff should be approached as a proper branding exercise with careful attention paid to a coherent forward thinking and clear strategy, combining clear brand values and essence with clear brand messaging that speaks properly to the target audience across all touch points in the City. Looking closely at copywriting, tone of voice, imagery, photography, illustration, messaging and how this is applied consistently and innovatively across all facets of the City from signage, transport, public spaces, joint promotion and linkup with other cities, through to public events etc.

Ideally branding that can adapt and evolve with the City and its growth/change/regeneration and branding that people living in the City can be a part of and feel speaks to them and communicates their City and its values to visitors from all over the world.

This is in direct contrast to an existing, tired, old fashioned and ugly logo centric solution plastered indiscriminately and clumsily across every facet of the city. Swansea and Newport are guilty of this too.

What’s the most important lesson you have learnt during your career so far?

Do the things you love, work on projects you love with people you like.

Who would you like to see speak at Creative Mornings Cardiff?

Chris Cunningham, Thomas Heatherwick, Elizabeth Gilbert, Dr Steve Peters, Bradley Wiggins, Tanni Grey-Thompson, Wayne Hemmingway, Norman Foster, Vaughan Oliver, Peter Saville, Mark Farrow, Camila Batmanghelidjh, Paul Smith, Kenneth Grange, Martin Lambie-Nairn, Julien Macdonald, Tony Kaye, Trevor Beattie, Mickey Smith, Timothy Everest, Jeff Banks, Terry Matthews, Michael Moritz, Peter Greenaway, Ruth Jones, Owen Sheers, Russell T Davies, James Dean Bradfield, Gruff Rhys, John Cale, Ben Drury, Simon Sinek, Gary Vaynerchuk, George Simkin, David Lynch, Hamish Muir, Morag Myerscough, Alan Kitching, Neville Brody, John Warwicker

Aimee Bateman (careercake.com), Mo Syed (https://www.facebook.com/ForLuca1), Nathaniel Jones, Rhydian Powell and Sam Jones (Weekend Offender), Anthony Shapland (g39 Gallery), Arrielle Tye (Promo Cymru), Dale Williams and Larkin Cen (Hokkei), Jo Aaron Lilford (Clout Branding), David Davies (Entrepreneur), Sean Rees (seanrees.co.uk), Mike Sullivan (studiomister.com), Tom Lloyd (bluegg.com), Nicola Rivers, Ross Hutchins (ourethos.co.uk), James Bearne (sequence.co.uk), Sam and Shauna (hangfiresmokehouse.com), Dylan Griffith (smorgasbordstudio.com), Paul Nicholas (baitstudio.com).

Did speaking at Creative Mornings affect you or change your outlook at all?

It did, it’s had a quite profound impact on me actually. I felt truly honored to be asked to talk and I’ve met some wonderful people directly from it. I felt really humbled by the number of people who took time out of their busy lives to hear me speak. Preparing the talk, made me really appreciate everybody who has been an influence on me and in my career, and I wanted to say thank you to them during my talk. It’s also a terrific confidence boost if I’m being honest.

Do you have any advice to future speakers?

Just be yourself, relax, tell your story, but most of all enjoy it. Only you can tell your own story properly with passion and conviction. Don’t drink too much coffee beforehand and take the time to speak to as many people as possible, before and after the talk.

Why do you think people should come along to Creative Mornings?

You meet fantastic people. It’s well organised in a fantastic building and it has a lovely relaxed atmosphere. You never know, you may get asked to give a talk yourself in the future. It’s also really nice to feel a part of (and adding a bit to) a vibrant creative community in Cardiff. (The coffee and cakes are great too!)

How important do you think Creativity is to our City?

It’s incredibly important. A lot of creative talent leaves Cardiff and Wales for the bright lights of London and farther afield but the great thing is that there is now a definite brain drain away from London back to Wales. This can only add positively to the creative mix and create opportunity for everybody as Wales shouts louder, creatively on a global scale.

Which is your favourite Creative Mornings talk?

I think all of them are great for many different reasons. I watched them all avidly for weeks before my talk trying to get pointers! I’ve learnt something important from all of them.

Find Alex on Twitter "https://twitter.com/designdforlife"

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