Check out this month’s edition of The Late Morning Show with host Tim Scroggs and this month’s speaker Dr. Kevan Frazier!

Speaker Spotlight - Dr. Kevan Frazier

Exec. Director, WCU Programs in Asheville | Co-Owner, Well Played Board Game Café | Founder, Asheville by Foot Walking Tours


Facebook | Instagram

Month: December | Theme: Silence

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice.
I’ve been working in higher education as a teacher and administrator for more than 20 years.  I find great joy in helping folks find their paths in life through education.  I became an entrepreneur six years ago with my first small business, Asheville by Foot Walking Tours and again in 2017, with the opening of Well Played Board Game Café on Wall Street. Well Played has been a kind of graduate internship in entrepreneurship.  I’m really proud of what the WP team is accomplishing in creating a space where folks can be themselves, without fear, and can put their phones down to have real face-to-face connections with other human beings.

What did you want to be when you grew up?
I had absolutely no clue.  That said, I loved playing teacher as a kid.  Nothing like giving your friends a quiz a playtime.

Can you remember when you first learned about your field of work? How did you discover what it was, and how did you know it was what you wanted to do?
I realized in my junior year of college that I wanted to go into higher education administration.  I also thought I wanted to be a professor but it wasn’t until I stood in front of a class for the time that I understood that teaching was my real path and that being an administrator and a business owner are all tied to being a teacher for me.  

What is the best part and hardest part of your job?
The best part is the students.  The hardest part is keeping the importance of education top-of-mind with policy makers and funders.

What about your community inspires you?
We still seem to be a community that can have a dialog and find compromise.

What is the best piece of business advice you’ve been given?
Pennies make dollars.

Can you name a moment of failure in your business experience that you learned from or that helped you improve your business or the way you work?
My greatest failure came when as a young higher education administrator I got ready to make a decision that was based on my career advancement and not my students.  A restless night’s sleep and good dose of self-awareness the next morning led me to change my decision.  

If you were magically given three more hours per day, what would you do with them?
Spend more time with my fiends.

Who are your favorite creators and makers, local and beyond?
Karie and Rob with Shelter Collective are amazing design warriors and the work that Justin and Brandy of the Horse and Hero/Big Crafty do to support the creative community is exceptional.

Anything else you’d like to share?
Listen to be heard.

Host Tim Scroggs sits down with this month’s speaker David Hughes after his talk on the theme of Lost for CreativeMornings Asheville.

Speaker Spotlight - David Hughes, P.E.

Energy Engineer & Traditional Music Teacher

Month: November | Theme: Lost

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice.
I am in a bit of a transition professionally.  Currently, I am renovating a house, teaching music part time, spending more time with my family and friends.  I am exploring new ways to generate income making music.   I also offer energy engineering and analysis services.  This is less in the Creative Mornings field, but still part of some of my weeks.    

What did you want to be when you grew up?
An engineer, but one that drives trains, rather than spreadsheets.  I have also wanted to be a musician, farmer, and educator.    

Can you remember when you first learned about your field of work? How did you discover what it was, and how did you know it was what you wanted to do?
Depends on the field.  Let’s go with music.  Mom bought me a guitar for my 12th birthday.  Dad bought me a 4-disc Smithsonian blues collection within the next year or so.  I’ve been passionately pursuing American roots music ever since.  

What is the best part and hardest part of your job?
Best part: singing with good people and students that are driven to learn and play music.
Worst part: students that I’m unable to inspire to want to learn and play music.

What on-the-job tools do you use every day?
Finger picks, slides, capos, tuners, and string winders.

What about your community inspires you?
Each year one particularly wonderful woman in our county decorates the bridge in Marshall with marigolds upon marigolds. It is an inspiring delight.

What is the best piece of business advice you’ve been given?
If you’re going to start a business, make it one that an idiot could run…  I assumed they meant it offensively/jokingly to me specifically.  I thought it was funny, but also good business advice.  Buy low and sell high.

Can you name a moment of failure in your business experience that you learned from or that helped you improve your business or the way you work?
I once filled a diesel work truck’s fuel tank with gasoline.  I have never repeated that mistake.

What books/resources would you recommend to someone interested in furthering their creative practice, or starting a creative business of their own?
A Pattern Language.  It’s about design and construction, but should be in a creator’s library.  

If you were magically given three more hours per day, what would you do with them?
I’d give one to my daughter for getting ready for school, one to my wife for sleep, and split the last one with my son.  With that 30 minutes, I’d try to play music, go for a run, and get a little extra sleep.

Who are your favorite creators and makers, local and beyond?
Old music - the thousands of Americans in early field recordings who sang for the sake of singing and how it made them feel. 
The Carter Family, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee, and the Georgia Sea Island Singers.  

Tim Scroggs sits down with Allison Scott after her talk on the theme of Flow.

Tim Scroggs sits down with North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green after her talk on the theme of Muse.

Speaker Spotlight - Allison Scott

Director of Policy and Programs at the Campaign for Southern Equality 

Website

Month: October | Theme: Flow

What did you want to be when you grew up?
Lawyer

What is the best part and hardest part of your job?
Talking with and hearing the stories from people in the LGBTQ community. When people are experiencing harassment or discrimination especially with youth, it can be heartbreaking. At the same time when you see this work have a positive impact on people’s lives the joy it brings to my soul is indescribable.

What on-the-job tools do you use every day?
Humor, friendship, and love

What about your community inspires you?
Resiliency, I’m often in complete awe of how the LGBTQ community can not only rise up but also show others what love and authenticity looks like.

What is the best piece of business advice you’ve been given?
Pause and reflect before taking action.

Can you name a moment of failure in your business experience that you learned from or that helped you improve your business or the way you work?
Learning to address conflict in a dignified but humble way. Being open to criticism while resisting the urge to be defensive.

If you were magically given three more hours per day, what would you do with them?
More reading time!

Who are your favorite creators and makers, local and beyond?
Street Art fascinates me as it often is boundary pushing and emotional, Bansky has always been my favorite.

Anything else you’d like to share?
Enjoy life, push yourself, and embrace fear.

Speaker Spotlight - Jaki Shelton Green

NC Poet Laureate

Website | Jacar Press | Blair (Carolina Wren) Press

Month: September | Theme: Muse


Photo by Sylvia Freeman

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice.
I have been writing poetry since I was very young. My practice is to show up everyday in my life in the everydayness and ordinary places where my creative intentions live and is thrive., ie. cooking, cleaning, laundry, weeding, planting, loving, mothering, daughtering, etc. I organically create natural patterns and schedules that weave in and out of all my other practices of BEING the practice. 

What did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be an oceanographer even though I’d never been to the ocean. I was obsessed with Jacques Cousteau and his explorations of the world(s) underwater.

Can you remember when you first learned about your field of work? How did you discover what it was, and how did you know it was what you wanted to do?
I started writing poetry and stories about my rural southern culture as a child. It was my maternal grandmother who guiding me into a realm of magical creativity through her connectedness to the natural world. She loved poetry and taught me how to listen to the poetry inside hailstorms, the rustle of a snake on dry leaves, the changing color of indigo, or the simmering of boiling water.
When I started writing at six years old, my mother gave me a diary every year for Christmas through my early 20’s. Those diaries whispered back to me and I knew I could never stop the flow of “telling” or “writing.”

What is the best part and hardest part of your job?
I celebrate building community across all the imagined and real boundaries through my poetry. Currently, my challenge is balancing BEING the writer and SERVING the role of NC Poet Laureate.

What on-the-job tools do you use every day?
Computer, razor felt pens, legal pads, journals

What about your community inspires you?
The history that “I know I know” and continually discovering more about the landscape of genetic deja-vu.

What is the best piece of business advice you’ve been given?
“Tell them what you’re worth. Do not bankrupt your spirit.”

Can you name a moment of failure in your business experience that you learned from or that helped you improve your business or the way you work?
I’ve encountered challenges, disappointments but nothing that I characterize as failure. I’ve miscalculated people because I have blindly trusted.

What books/resources would you recommend to someone interested in furthering their creative practice, or starting a creative business of their own?
Talk to those who have walked before you. Research. Be clear about your mission and how to curate your projects.

If you were magically given three more hours per day, what would you do with them?
WRITE. READ.

Who are your favorite creators and makers, local and beyond?
Rumi, James Baldwin, Mary Ellen Lough ( Medicine Bundles/Asheville), Abdullateef Fisher, William Moore (Sculptor) Bryant Holsenbeck (Environmental Artist)

Anything else you’d like to share?
Much gratitude for allowing me to show up in this space.

Late Morning Show with CreativeMornings Asheville
Join host Tim Scroggs of Futures Bright as he sits down with this month’s speaker Nicole Townsend after to her amazing talk on the theme of Justice.

Speaker Spotlight—Nicole Townsend, 

Community/Regional Organizer

Instagram

Month: August | Theme: Justice

What did you want to be when you grew up?
Teacher. 

What is the best part and hardest part of your job?
The best part is building relationships. The hardest part is being on the road back-to-back, weeks at a time. 

What about your community inspires you?
Black joy inspires me. 

What books/resources would you recommend to someone interested in furthering their creative practice, or starting a creative business of their own?
How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective

If you were magically given three more hours per day, what would you do with them?
If I had three more hours per day I could raise chickens. 

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